1. Transport and Force Generation by Molecular Motors:

 The organization inside a cell is maintained through a transportation system in which proteins called molecular motors (kinesin, dynein and unconventional myosin) haul cargo from one place to another along cytoskeletal filaments (microtubules and actin).

These molecular motors often function in team and our understanding of how these multiple motors function together is less developed. For example

1. How the team-work of these motors depends on the biophysical properties of individual motors engaged on cargo?

2. How switching of cargos from one filament to another is decided at microtubule and actin junctions inside cells?

3. How the team-work of these motors is modulated by various regulators?

The breakdown of this transportation system has been associated with neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s. A better understanding of mechanism of intracellular transport will aid in the design of new therapeutic approaches.

Related Recent Publications from Lab:
  • Anjneya Takshak and Ambarish Kunwar, Importance of anisotropy in detachment rates for force production and cargo transport by a team of motor proteins, Protein Science, DOI 10.1002/pro.2905 (2016)
  • Roop Mallik, Arpan Kumar Rai, Pradeep Barak, Ashim Rai and Ambarish Kunwar, Teamwork in Microtubule Motors, Trends in Cell Biology,Vol. 23, 575 (2013)

2. Force Generation by Microtubule Bundles:

Featured_Image3

Motor-induced organization of cytoskeletal filaments microtubules and actin into dynamic bundles is crucial for many biological processes such as axonal growth, muscle contraction, cell division and platelet formation. We used used computational modeling to understand how the physical properties such as force generation, expansion rate etc. depend the the properties of motors, cross-linkers and cytoskeletal filaments constituting the bundle.

Related Recent Publications from Lab:
  • Hanumant Pratap Singh, Anjneya Takshak, Utkarsh Mall and Ambarish Kunwar, Sliding of Microtubules by A Team of Dynein motors: Understanding the Effect of Spatial Distribution of Motor Tails and Mutual Exclusion of Motor Heads on Microtubules,  International Journal of Modern Physics C, Accepted (2016)

3. In-silico studies of interaction of microtubule-targeting anti-cancer drugs:

Microtubule play an important role during cell division. Microtubule are targets for various potential anti-cancer drugs. We are studying interaction of various potential drugs with microtubule using a number of tools such as theoretical/computational modeling, virtual screening, molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations.

Related Recent Publications from Lab:
  • Bajarang Vasant Kumbhar, Anubhaw Borogaon, Dulal Panda and Ambarish Kunwar, Exploring the Origin of Differential Binding Affinities of Human Tubulin Isotypes αβII, αβIII and αβIV for DAMA-colchicine using Homology Modelling, Molecular Docking and Molecular Dynamics Simulation, PLOS ONE (2016)

4. In-silico studies of  potential anti-leishmania compounds:

leishmania

We are engaged in in-silico studies of interaction of various potential anti-leishmania drugs using a number of tools such as theoretical/computational modeling, virtual screening, molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations.

Related Recent Publications from Lab:
  • Rajan Kumar Pandey, Bajrang Vasant Kumbhar, Shyam Sundar, Ambarish Kunwar and Vijay Kumar Prajapati, Structure based virtual screening, molecular docking, ADMET and molecular simulations to develop benzoxaborole analogues as potential inhibitor against Leishmania donovani trypanothione reductase,  Journal of Receptors and Signal Transduction, Accepted (2016)
  • Rajan Kumar Pandey, Bajarang Vasant Kumbhar, Shubham Srivastava, Ruchi Malik, Shyam Sundar, Ambarish Kunwar and Vijay Kumar Prajapati, Febrifugine analogues as Leishmaniadonovani trypanothione reductase inhibitors: binding energy analysis assisted by molecular docking, ADMET and molecular dynamics simulation,  Journal of Biomolecular Structure and Dynamics, DOI 10.1080/07391102.2015.1135298 (2016)